Category Archives: Uncategorized

Will Crufts, the Kennel Club and breed clubs ever take Cavalier health to heart?

I’m sorry I haven’t blogged in a while – will catch up this week – but this is FAR too important not to share. Consider this when supporting a show that does not care about the health of the dogs being shown.

Cavaliers Are Special

35k news.jpgAnyone who truly loves Cavaliers will be hoping that this year’s Crufts doesn’t result in yet another “Best Of Breed” winner who, when it comes to responsible breeding, turns out to be the worst of examples. All too often, the winners have been bred at a ridiculously tender age, making a mockery of health protocols put in place to reduce the burden of inherited disease that these gorgeous little dogs carry. On the eve of Crufts, the Cavalier health petition passed the 35,000-signature mark: making clear that a large number of dog lovers do feel strongly that much more must be done to help this breed.

We’ve done an analysis of some of the top-winning and most prolific-siring Cavaliers of 2016 and 2017. While this threw up a lot of areas of great concern, there were some positives. For example, the number of top show dogs, many of which are…

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Primal Dog Food Recall

BEFORE YOU WORRY TOO MUCH – this is a voluntary recall and does not involve anything that has made dogs sick. Still, I would like to share, particularly as a frequent user of Primal products.

Learning from Dogs

This was sent to me back on the 22nd December.

December 21, 2017 — Primal Pet Foods of Fairfield, California, is voluntarily recalling specific lots of 5 of its freeze-dried poultry products because their grind size exceeds the ideal size of ground bone to be fed to dogs and cats.

What’s Recalled?

Affected products include Primal Canine and Feline Freeze-Dried Poultry Formulas.

Click here for a more readable copy of the following list of recalled products.

Company Comments

Primal has posted the following comments about this recall on its website:

  • This is a Primal production specification issue – it poses absolutely no risk to human health.
  • We have very precise requirements as to how our foods are to be produced so they preform optimally.
  • We require our meat and bones be ground down to a coarseness of 1/8″
  • Over a single production run, the wrong grind plate was used…

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Too many dogs are being killed!

Read this wonderful post on why you should adopt shelter dogs and debunking some of the myths about them.

Learning from Dogs

A plea to choose a shelter dog before other sources!

Of the six dogs that we have here at home only one, Cleo, came to us from a breeder. That was because we specifically wanted a GSD puppy to be a playmate for Pharaoh as he was getting into his final years.

Pharaoh demonstrating his benevolent status with puppy Cleo. April 2012.

The other five are all dogs that we took from rescue shelters or, in the case of Brandy, from a couple that couldn’t handle such a big dog despite him being the most placid and loving dog one could ever come across.

The Care2 blogsite recently published an article that hammered home the reasons why everyone should (nay, must!) consider a shelter dog first.

Please read and share this. For the sake of those thousands of dogs that never have the joy of loving owners in their lives.

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Oh, Charlie

Last week I introduced everyone to Charlie, our newly adopted (surprise) puppy. Charlie comes from the same rescue as Callie and likely the same puppy mill. It’s not just my guess that they might; the women in charge were pretty certain, the other male, a five-year-old stud, had the same look as Charlie and Callie, as well as another dog rescued three years ago by a woman I met recently on FB. Here’s last week’s post if you need to catch up.

 

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Twinsies

 

It’s interesting because this mill breeds for certain positive breed aspects, like the slightly longer nose which helps to avoid bronchial issues and a size that fits close to the breed standard. No, they are not good breeders. It is a farm. I just found that piece of the puzzle curious.

Charlie rode the puppy roller coaster. He was sent out to a broker to be sold to a pet store, but the pet stores didn’t want him, and he was sent back. Lucky Charlie, just before the next auction, the rescue took a trip out to Ohio and brought him back.

Charlie is a puppy mill mascot. Unlike Callie who managed to make it out at six years old and in perfect health, he came to us with some things we knew about and some we didn’t.

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Puppy Snuggles 😍

Before they headed out, all the dogs visited the vet in Ohio where they noted that Charlie has “grade 1” luxating patellas and an umbilical hernia.

Luxating patellas are when a dog has a very flat patella ridge. This means the kneecap doesn’t seat snugly in the groove and it can pop out either medially, to the inside, or laterally, to the outside.
There are four levels of severity of a luxating patella. Grade 1 is the mildest; Grade 4 is the most severe.
• A Grade 1 luxating patella describes a kneecap that pops out (or can be manually popped out of place) but pops right back in on its own.
• Grade 2 describes a kneecap that pops out of place and doesn’t always pop back in automatically, sometimes requiring manual manipulation to re-seat it.
• A Grade 3 condition is when the kneecap sits outside its groove most of the time but can be manually positioned back in the groove, where it stays temporarily.
• Grade 4 luxating patella describes the worst-case scenario, in which the kneecap sits outside the groove all the time, and won’t stay seated in the groove when it is manually popped into place.

The morning after the caravan arrived back in VT, we got a call about the availability of an 11-week old puppy or a five-year-old male stud – to be neutered, but if we wanted one, especially the puppy, we had to come that day. Sherry did tell us about his knees before we made the trip. We quickly discussed the pros and cons and made the call to go “meet” (i.e. get, lol) the puppy.

Charlie came home without having visited the groomers yet and with diarrhea and a little cough. First, if you haven’t ever smelled a puppy mill or a dog from one, it is horrendous. Little Charlie was so sweet and snuggly, but he reeked! The first chance we got on the trip home we stopped for doggie bath wipes to get as much of the green and brown stains and nasty smell off him.

I made an appointment with our vet, however, due to one vet being on vacation, we had to wait a few days for a time. Charlie’s cough went away within a day or so, he just needed to be consistently warm. His diarrhea didn’t though. I was fairly sure he had some parasite that wasn’t treated by regular de-worming, but it wasn’t until I saw some blood in his stool that I called the vet and made an emergency appointment.

Charlie had giardia, coccidia, and whipworms, poor baby. That was a lot of medication! Even Callie had to be treated again. The vet also confirmed his luxating patellas although she said she doesn’t grade them when the puppy is this young and also informed us that Charlie has a minor heart murmur.

Because he is so young, we are lucky, and there are some things we can do to counteract his physical issues. Regarding the murmur, the two most important are diet and exercise – keeping him at the correct weight when he is grown, and daily exercise may keep his heart working a bit better. Regarding the kneecaps, again exercise and weight, but certain exercises are particularly beneficial.

As our vet recommended, we do a lot of hill climbs, up and down, both straight and in zig zags, and anything else we can think of that will strengthen his quads as those are the muscles that will be the most beneficial. Also helps tire the rambunctious puppy out! It’s been excellent for Callie too.

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Out for a walk with the girl!

Hey – got any good game or exercise ideas that are low-impact on the knees but work the quads on our pup?

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Tug seems to be a good one, too.

Don’t worry all – Charlie is doing GREAT! These are just things we have to keep in mind as he grows. And these are some issues that puppy mills cause. FIGHT TO END PUPPY FARMING!

When Callie Met Charlie

Or – KABOOM! Here Comes Charlie!          WHAT?!

So we got a ridiculously big surprise this weekend.

Jess and I had been talking about getting another Cavalier after we move at the beginning of July but I felt like we were going to be in a bit of a predicament. We wanted to both rescue again and be able to get a younger male, preferably still puppy aged, this time. That’s often difficult to find with Cavalier King Charles Spaniel rescues.

The Cavalier Rescue USA does an excellent job. However, most of their Northeast rescues are too far away from us for them to consider our application. The rescues are rarely within 3-4 hours of us.

I’ve kept in touch with the rescue Callie came from, Champlain Valley Canine Rescue, since we got her and they were aware that we were looking for a young male. Well,
Sherry called us Sunday morning – they had an 11-week old male Cavalier puppy – did we want him and if so, we had to go get him that day. AHHH!!!!!!

We had a quick debate, knowing the risks of adopting a puppy mill puppy, but we decided to go for it, I mean, fate, right?

Meet Charlie

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This face doesn’t say naughty, not at all😂

And OMD did we fall in love.

I mean, just look at that face! Sweetness and LOVE!

Callie was unamused when we first arrived home. I think she was a good bit jealous and worried about her position in the family but, of course, we make sure to greet her first, give her extra treats “hmm… I get treats when Charlie goes potty outside… 😋” etc. And Callie has become a slightly more snuggly dog, at least asking for affection more.

 

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“I guess I’ll pose with him if you MAKE me.”

 

Callie came around to the idea of Charlie by Monday afternoon, at which point she decided he was her puppy.

I’m pretty sure I’ve mentioned this on here before, but Callie’s never been one for making any noise, let alone the amount of yelping and harping we got when we took him out of the room on Monday evening or Tuesday. That was until he reminded her how annoying puppies can be. Wednesday morning we heard Callie BARK, a sound we didn’t know she could even make! I think she got a little tired of the rambunctious monster hanging from her ears.

 

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Who me? Never! I as sweet as can be!

I was a little worried how things would go once G got here and Callie had to share her precious child – we prepped G about how important it was to make Callie feel special, Charlie thinks he is special enough 😂, etc.

Well, I think it went ok.

She did some car multi-tasking, holding Charlie while petting Callie, and also discovered that as cute as he is, it’s not fun to try to snuggle on the couch with a wild puppy. Callie earned her lap back in under 5 minutes!

I think it will all work out.

Here’s the car ride home from dropping G off at school yesterday:

 

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Who needs their own bed when big sisfur’s (already too small) car bed is there to share? 😍

And, while I couldn’t ever get a picture where they were both still, G and Charlie have some serious puppy love going on too ❤️.

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I’ll update more on Charlie soon. He’s going to be our mascot against puppy mills and bad breeders as he already has luxating patellas and a minor heart murmur. But for now, I leave you with this – a happy, silly puppy video❤️ ❤️ ❤️! Makes everyone smile 😊

p.s. please excuse the lack of full puppy-proofing in the room when we took this video.